Scary Marketing Companies: Are You Safe?

By: Jake

It seems like social media marketing companies are popping up everywhere, and some of them can be real characters. This Halloween season, here are some scary marketing company types to avoid.

 

The Empty Promisers

 

This company will promise everything and anything to get you onboard, but after a short honeymoon period, you can’t quite figure out what you’re paying them for.

 

Fail: Keeping excited about clients after they’ve signed; doing stuff.

 

What You Can Do: Every month your customers don’t hear from you in some way leads to a 10% decrease in your company’s influence on them. Hold your marketing company accountable by demanding an end-of-month report outlining all their efforts for you that month. From there, you should be able to deduce if you’re paying them for services, or for the new ping-pong table and nap area in their office.

 

The Overzealous Social Media Gurus

 

Their online presence on your behalf is excessive, to the point of seriously bugging your current followers. They definitely believe in the “more is more” philosophy.

 

Fail: Understanding that “personal space” exists even in the online world.

 

What You Can Do: These guys don’t necessarily have the wrong idea: Having 3-4 personal details in an email boosts clickthrough rate by 63%. 7+ personal elements boosted clickthroughs by 318%.

 

However, the more personalized and the more frequent ads get, the higher the likelihood that social media users will get creeped out. If you get negative comments from customers, tell the marketing company to back off a little. Remember: helpful, never pushy.

 

The Quant Geeks

 

This company capitalizes on the “big data” movement and uses the fanciest language to bury you in the latest analytics trend stats. If you keep hearing about how “an immersive experience” through “snackable content” and “360 campaigns” will increase “ROI” in the “SoLoMo” sector, it’s time to put a stop on this runaway train and get some answers.

 

Fail: Summarizing their findings into understandable, actionable strategy.

 

What You Can Do: Ask them how they’re going to get their big data to translate into big results. After all, data for data’s sake never did anybody any good. When things get too tech-y for your level of understanding, don’t be afraid to ask for an explanation. At Little Jack, we firmly believe that if something can’t be explained in a reasonable amount of time, there is a serious chance that it doesn’t actually exist.

 

The things entrepreneurs do are complicated enough. There’s no reason to spend your limited resources on a marketing company that is anything but fully engaged, ultra-responsive, and down-to-earth.